Tag Archives: hackaday.io

ИГГ1-64/64M Adventure

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It appends I spend a bit of time on eBay looking for uncommon or old displays such as the famous Nixie tubes. Large matrix displays emerge some time ago maybe due to the discover of an old stock. However, I never found someone using them, for a good reason. Around 360 Volts is needed to light up a pixel.

Gazotron

gazotronGazotron, or Газотрон is (or was) an Ukrainian electronic tube manufacturer (do not confuse with Gas-o-tron). It’s not easy to find information about this company, even gazotron.com is closed. But actually there is still plenty of their products available if you would like to buy electronic tubes, such as IN4-nixie tubes. The logo is dot inside a circle.

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They made in the 90’s different sort of dot matrix panels. They are quite large, 19x19cm, and for the moment I saw 3 kind of pixel composition. A 32×32 matrix, all pixels are green. A 64×64 matrix, pixels alternating green and red, and finally a 64×64 matrix with red-green-blue alternating pixels.

I bought one green-red some time ago, and recently saw a page on hackaday.io that revive my interest.

Seek for information

The short datasheet provided with the screens (shown in the mentioned page) explains the voltage values needed to light up the pixels as well as the timings, but it does not help to find a way to generate these high voltage signals.

My research on internet first leads me to this Youtube video demonstrating a 8×8 pixel drive, and a quick view of the breadboard circuit. Then I start to find forums written in Russian where someone manage to drive the all 32×32 matrix.

And finally, a piece of a datasheet showing a circuit example able to generate the ~400 Volts anode signal from a 200 Volts source.

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Test Drive

I reproduced the circuit on a breadboard as well, using a 180V ‘nixie’ power supply.

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Motivated by this success, I started Kicad and designed a PCB. I Selected SMT components in order to reduce the size of the 64 anode drivers and the 64 cathode drivers. The board arrived as perfect as usual with OSHPark.

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And they are working!

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Cabling and soldering

There is 92 components and 34 wires on each of the 8 boards to solder. As I don’t own a air soldering station, I did everything with a good iron and solid patience.

But it was worth the effort, they all work great.

Interface

I used the same micro-controller as the BIG_CLOCK to talk with the high voltage boards. Especially because it has at least the 32 outputs needed. To interface this controller with the outside world and being able to display some useful pictures, I used the serial port.

I could then make a tiny Java program that copy part of the computer screen and send it to the serial port.

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Fun with Pixel Dust

I was quite amazed by the code demonstrated on a 64×64 led matrix by Adafruit (https://www.adafruit.com/product/3649). So why not trying this on the IGG1 display?

I have a MPU-9250 IMU and a raspberry-pi zero. However I need to adapt the code for this accelerometer, and send the data to the screen with the serial port. I’m more comfortable with Java than C or python, then I translate the code from Adafruit in Java.

To conclude

The full story and details are on the hackaday.io page here:

https://hackaday.io/project/46302-1-64x64m-adventure

Sources and schematics are on the following github repository:

https://github.com/pierre-muth/IGG_-64x64M

It was really a good time see this screen getting back to life, now it needs a purpose such as a weather forecast display or a nice clock. A lot is possible with the raspberry pi, including the use of the PIR sensor to only turn on the screen when someone is around…

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PolaPi-Zero

8659491486300188651 The PolaPi camera flew to new adventures quite a long ago. I hope it still works and the new owner is using it time to time. I missed it a bit so it is time to rebuild one. In the meantime other parts got out on the market. Such as a smaller thermal printer and the smaller Raspberry pi Zero.

Here we have a good opportunity to try to slightly simplify the project and add features missing on the previous one.

By simplifying I mean avoid the thermal printer hack of the previous PolaPi, and use Python instead of Java. And by features I mean the possibility of review and re-print pictures. More details can be or will be on this Hackaday.io page.

Is all about monochrome.

The Adafruit nano printer is only capable of printing black dots. So it is for the Sharp Memory LCD. Except the printer’s resolution is slightly higher than the screen, I like the coherence between_mg_5911 what you see and what you get.

Vít Hašek made it’s own PolaPi and push the concept for his thesis. He called it the white box, in opposition of today’s black box devices.

It is mainly the reason why I made the new one white as well.

Under the hood.

The electronic hardware is similar of the previous one, except the screen.shematics01

However I used 3D printed part for the case.

A button is for taking picture and change to ‘live view’ mode. Another to print the picture file or change to ‘review’ mode. Two others to navigate through the image files. And finally a last one to initiate the raspberry pi shutdown

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The Python code and the way to get the LCD library compiled is still a bit messy at the time of writing, but I’ve put everything on github. Moreover, you can get the SDcard image on this dropbox.

Wireless remote display

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Abstract.

07_rack_frontFor a while now the Pilogger needs a small remote display. The logging station is neither particularly compact nor elegant, therefore I made some tests about a battery powered status display. I tried solutions which I never used mainly by curiosity but also in order to continue to learn something. Especially the Wifi chip ESP8266 and a Sharp memory LCD. For tests logbook, see the Hackaday.io page

Wireless.

esp-12e-frontThe wave of the famous ESP8266 wifi chip from espressif reached me few time ago, but I never experimented it. As a complete image has to be transmitted, the wifi sounds a good solution and the ESP8266 is very capable (beside being very cheap). There is plenty of solution to program it, among the official SDK, microPython or arduino, I chose to test the nodeMCU one. From building the firmware to the integrated development environment ESPlorer, everything is clearly explained on nodeMCU documentation website.

Memory LCD.

LCDA now common solution for very low consumption display is e-ink or e-paper, but another solution from Sharp is interesting as well. There is significant differences between the two, for example the memory LCDs don’t keep the image while out of power. However the current needed to maintain an image is very low, the refresh rate is fast, and the surrounding electronics are very simple. I choose the Sharp LS044Q7DH01, a monochrome 320×240 pixel, 4.4″ display.

Prototype.

For the firsts tests I begun by my usual ugly wiring on a proto-board. I made a schematics with some option regarding the LCD driving. The LCD needs 5V and TI have a convenient boost converter: REG710NA-5. For the ESP12E wiring, Adafruit made a very nice job with their Huzzah board.

Codes.

After some divergeant ideas and solutions, I used sockets to transfert the image from the Raspberry pi to the ESP8266. In fact, the raspberry java code generate directly the data that should be transmitted to the LCD. The ESP Lua code is then just a bridge between socket and the SPI LCD connection. The Lua and Java code is on github (init.lua, socketLCD.lua and WifiDisplay.java).

The ESP is in deep sleep as much as possible. When waking-up, it connects and takes an IP from the house Wifi access point, connects to the raspberry pi socket, receives the image data and sends it in the same time to the LCD, and finally goes back to deep sleep.

PCB.

We cannot stay with a prototype, and for the first time I tried the OSHpark services. What an amazingly good experience! I used Kicad for schematics and board design as the file format is directly compatible. I’ve uploaded one file, and 20 days later the 3 boards were in the mail box. The quality is very impressive, and the pricing for small size is unbeatable. The board can be find here.

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Frame.

As a frame, for the moment I’m staying with a simple aluminium plate. Few copper plates to fix the board do the job.

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Outlook.

With a 2 minutes refresh rate, the batteries survive around one week. There is then still some improvements to do, such as lower refresh rate during night. Another point I should keep an eye on is the LCD driving. The Sharp datasheet recommend to invert a signal either by a serial command or a physical pin (EXTMODE and EXTCOMIN), thus at a minimum frequency of 1Hz. To lower the consumption, this inversion only appends when refreshing to avoid waking up the ESP8266. After few weeks I didn’t notice any artifact on the LCD. Sharp mention a risk of image retention as well, so an inverted image during night time might be a good idea.